hold

I.
/hoʊld / (say hohld)

verb (held, held or, Archaic, holden, holding)
verb (t)
1. to have or keep in the hand; keep fast; grasp.
2. to reserve; retain; set aside.
3. to bear, sustain, or support with the hand, arms, etc., or by any means.
4. to keep in a specified state, relation, etc.: to hold the enemy in check.
5. to keep in custody; detain.
6. to engage in; preside over; carry on; pursue; observe or celebrate: to hold a meeting.
7. to have the ownership or use of; keep as one's own; occupy: to hold office.
8. to contain or be capable of containing: this bottle holds two litres.
9. to have or keep in the mind; think or believe; entertain: to hold a belief.
10. to regard or consider: to hold a person responsible.
11. Law (of a court) to decide.
12. to regard with a specified degree of affection or attachment: to hold someone dear; to hold someone cheap.
13. to keep (territory, etc.) forcibly, as against an adversary.
verb (copular)
14. to remain or continue in a specified state, relation, etc.: to hold still.
verb (i)
15. to remain fast; adhere; cling: the anchor holds.
16. to keep or maintain a grasp on something.
17. to maintain one's position against opposition; continue in resistance.
18. to remain attached, faithful, or steadfast: to hold to one's purpose.
19. to remain valid; be in force: the rule does not hold.
20. (usually in the imperative) Archaic to refrain or forbear.
21. Colloquial to have adequate money or assets: how are you holding?
noun
22. the act of holding fast by a grasp of the hand or by some other physical means; grasp; grip: take hold.
23. something to hold a thing by, as a handle; something to grasp for support.
24. one of a set of ways of grasping an opponent in wrestling.
25. a thing that holds fast or supports something else.
26. a controlling device or setting: a horizontal hold on a screen.
27. a controlling force, or dominating influence: to have a hold on a person.
28. Archery the time during which the archer stands with bow drawn before loosing the arrow.
29. Archaic a fortified place, or stronghold.
phrase
30. get a hold on oneself, Colloquial to get control over oneself.
31. get hold of, to secure, obtain, or reserve: to get hold of a taxi.
32. hold a catch, Cricket to retain control of the ball after a catch so that the catch is considered valid.
33. hold back,
a. to restrain or check.
b. to retain possession of; keep back; withhold.
34. hold down,
a. to maintain a grasp on (someone or something) while exerting a downward pressure.
b. to continue to hold (a position, job, etc.), especially in spite of difficulties.
35. hold fast,
a. to cling to something very tightly.
b. to maintain a position against all opposition.
36. hold forth,
a. to propose as likely: he held forth little prospect of improvement.
b. to speak pompously or at tedious length: she held forth about her achievements.
37. hold from (or to), to hold (property) by grant of; derive title to.
38. hold good, to be true; be valid.
39. hold in, to restrain, check, or curb: he managed to hold in his anger.
40. hold it, (a call to someone to stop, wait, etc.)
41. hold off,
a. to keep aloof or at a distance.
b. to refrain from action.
42. hold office, to be the incumbent in a particular position, role, etc.
43. hold on,
a. to keep fast hold on something.
b. to continue; persist.
c. (chiefly in the imperative) Colloquial to stop or wait: to tell someone to hold on; hold on!
44. hold one's own, to maintain one's position or condition.
45. hold one's tongue (or peace), to keep silent; cease or refrain from speaking.
46. hold out,
a. to offer or present.
b. to extend or stretch forth.
c. to continue to exist; last.
d. to refuse to yield or submit.
e. Colloquial to keep back something expected or due.
47. hold out for, to remain adamant in expectation of: I'm going to hold out for a better offer.
48. hold over,
a. to keep for future consideration or action; postpone.
b. Music to prolong (a note) from one to the next.
49. hold someone's hand, Colloquial to provide moral support for someone.
50. hold the ball, Australian Rules to retain possession of the ball when seized by another player, thereby incurring a penalty.
51. hold the line, (of someone on the telephone) to wait.
52. hold the road, (of tyres on a motor vehicle) to grip the road.
53. hold to, to abide by; keep to.
54. hold together,
a. to cause to remain in one piece: only one bolt holds it together.
b. to cause to remain functioning as a unit: the sergeant held the company together.
c. to remain whole or in one piece.
55. hold true, to remain as a constant fact, regardless of a change in context or circumstances.
56. hold up,
a. to keep in an erect position.
b. to present to notice; exhibit; display.
c. to hinder; delay.
d. to stop by force in order to rob.
e. to remain intact: her testimony held up under cross-examination.
f. to cope in distressing circumstances.
57. hold water,
a. to retain water; not let water run through.
b. to prove sound, tenable, or valid: Mr Black's claims will not hold water.
58. hold with, to agree with; approve of.
59. no holds barred,
a. Wrestling with no restrictions as to rules.
b. without restraint or inhibition.
{Phrase Origin: from all-in wrestling in which no engagement with an opponent was disallowed}
60. on hold,
a. temporarily in abeyance: we've got that plan on hold.
b. (of a telephone caller) temporarily kept waiting, but not disconnected, while the recipient of the call attends to other business.
{Phrase Origin: from the button marked `Hold' on a telephone, used to temporarily suspend one caller while talking to another}
{Middle English holden, Old English h(e)aldan}
II.
[c]/hoʊld / (say hohld)

noun Nautical
the interior of a ship below the deck, especially where the cargo is stowed.
{variant of hole}

Australian English dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hold — Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed, tend… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold — hold1 [hōld] vt. held, holding [ME holden < Anglian OE haldan (WS healdan), akin to Ger halten, Goth haldan, to tend sheep < IE base * kel , to drive, incite to action > Gr kelēs, swift horse, L celer, swift: prob. sense development:… …   English World dictionary

  • Hold On — may refer to:ongs* Hold On (Tim Armstrong song) * Hold On (En Vogue song) * Hold On (Good Charlotte song) * Hold On (Jonas Brothers song) * Hold On (Korn song) * Hold On (John Lennon song) * Hold On (Magnet song) * Hold On (Razorlight song) *… …   Wikipedia

  • hold — Ⅰ. hold [1] ► VERB (past and past part. held) 1) grasp, carry, or support. 2) keep or detain. 3) have in one s possession. 4) contain or be capable of containing. 5) have or occupy (a job or position) …   English terms dictionary

  • hold-up — [ ɔldɶp ] n. m. inv. • 1925; mot angl. amér., de to hold up one s hands « tenir les mains en l air » ♦ Anglic. Vol à main armée dans un lieu public. ⇒Fam. braquage. Hold up d une banque. Commettre un hold up. hold up n. m. inv. (Anglicisme)… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Hold — Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough! Shak …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold on — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold up — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold — vb 1 hold back, withhold, reserve, detain, retain, *keep, keep back, keep out Analogous words: *restrain, inhibit, curb, check: preserve, conserve, *save Contrasted words: *relinquish, surrender, abandon, resign, yield 2 …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Hold — (h[=o]ld), n. 1. The act of holding, as in or with the hands or arms; the manner of holding, whether firm or loose; seizure; grasp; clasp; grip; possession; often used with the verbs take and lay. [1913 Webster] Ne have I not twelve pence within… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold Me — Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me Saltar a navegación, búsqueda «Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me» Sencillo de U2 del álbum Batman Forever Soundtrack Publicación 5 y 6 de junio 1995 …   Wikipedia Español

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